What is next?

06/03/2010

A friend of mine asked me: “What is your problem with Saudi Arabia?” Well, I said: Justice, Equal Rights, Choice, and Trust

We live in a country where people abandon their rights because they believe they will never have them. We lack trust in our government, and we lack trust in our judicial system.

I don’t want to force people to follow my believes, yet I want to have the freedom to follow my own. I want to be able to walk in the street without covering my face and without others whispering behind my back: “Astaghfor Allah,” Muttawa shouting at me, and people judging me based upon what’s on my head! I want to have the choice to go out with my cousins to any restaurant without fearing that Muttawa would come arrest us and sentence us to 50 lashes each. I don’t want to be judged because I don’t fear putting my pictures on Facebook. I don’t want to be judged because I deal with men. I don’t want to be judged because I don’t mind appearing on TV. I don’t want to be judged because my father allows me to travel alone. I don’t want to be judged because I sit with my male cousins. It is a choice! I am not bad because I am different. I am just different.

“Your father trusts you,” she said. “But the society doesn’t.”

“Show our women that you trust them, as much as you in fact depend on them” Woodrow Wilson once said. You should trust that we can, and will make the right decisions. Trust us, because we are your partners in life. We gave, we sacrificed, we suffered, we accepted, we listened, and we obeyed. Why are you willing to make us partners in suffering but not in rights?

Now is the time for us to be full partners. Trust us, and believe in us. Having our rights doesn’t mean excluding men from our lives and disrespecting them. It means sharing the responsibility and become equal partners.

The problem is that women are afraid. Afraid of the responsibility, because they have been taught and they believed that they are useless, and that they can do nothing but cook, clean, and raise children which I think the biggest responsibility of all. Women want to be in the safe side, and they rather not face the world as long as there is someone who can face it instead of them. Well, one day there won’t be anyone and you will have to do it on your own.

Rights are taken, not given. And if we don’t take them by force we will never have them. Sitting behind our computers and writing these blog posts and making online campaigns will do nothing. We tried it and it didn’t work.

What is next?

By: Najla Barasain

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9 Responses to “What is next?”

  1. Amazonbaby Says:

    Fernando,

    All those words and you said nothing…you were rude, too.

  2. Arianna A. Says:

    Well said…women need to step it up and take charge when they can. Sure, society not giving women opportunities is an honest excuse, but a woman living in fear because of what people may think is ridiculous.


  3. Najla – Thank you for writing this and speaking up as a Saudi woman. I get frustrated because I know there must be women out there who feel the same way that I do about the women’s situation here. Thank you for letting me know that I’m not crazy!

  4. مها نور إلهي Says:

    What is next?
    Educate yourself deeply about your rights in Islam….take it from the original sources, not from today’s scholars.read a lot about how other cultures have developed…read about the history of other countries……work very hard to prove to the people (practically) that you are not just a pretty face or a source of shame…be close to God…you’ll get what you want…Complaining won’t take you any where…Be active and productive instead of being reactive…and set your goals according to your reality…bigger goals will come by default once you start to achieve the smaller attainable goals…
    The problem of many young Saudi women is that they want to change their country whilst they should start by changing themselves…There is no rule in Saudi Arabia that prevents you from educating yourself the way you want…it all starts by education…
    By the way, why do you care about people judging you? You should be stronger than this…as long as you know you are not doing something that upsets Allah , nothing should affect you…Once I was followed by a mutawee..he asked me to cover my face and I recited to him all the verses and hadith and scholars’ views on “uncovering the face”…he ran away telling his freinds…leave her…she knows a lot!

    Thank you


  5. […] Zionist invasion in 2006. For Iraq there was Salam al-Janabi present, from Saudi Arabia blogger Najla Barasain was there, from Morocco Hisham AlMiraat, US-based Ahmed Al-Omran and Rachid Jankari, for Oman […]


  6. […] Zionist invasion in 2006. For Iraq there was Salam al-Janabi present, from Saudi Arabia blogger Najla Barasain was there, from Morocco Hisham AlMiraat, US-based Ahmed Al-Omran and Rachid Jankari, for Oman […]


  7. […] Zionist invasion in 2006. For Iraq there was Salam al-Janabi present, from Saudi Arabia blogger Najla Barasain was there, from Morocco Hisham AlMiraat, US-based Ahmed Al-Omran and Rachid Jankari, for Oman […]


  8. […] Zionist invasion in 2006. For Iraq there was Salam al-Janabi present, from Saudi Arabia blogger Najla Barasain was there, from Morocco Hisham AlMiraat, US-based Ahmed Al-Omran and Rachid Jankari, for Oman […]


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